Nothing will motivate a man to move forward faster than knowing what's behind Him.

Archive for the ‘Black Publication’ Category

Events In African American History For November 09


1. In 1868,  Medical School at Howard University opened with eight (8) students.

2. In 1901, Fiery pioneer black journalist William Monroe Trotter starts theGuardian newspaper in Boston. Trotter made headlines throughout the nation when in November 1914, he confronted President Woodrow Wilson in the White House for failing to do more to stop the lynching of blacks.

Events In African American History For November 08


1. In 1892,  More Awful Lychings, One hundred and sixty one Blacks reported lynched.

2. In 1898,   The Riot of 1898, in two days of racial violence, a mob of whites, led by some of Wilmington’s most respected and influential citizens, destroyed the state’s only daily African American newspaper. Coroner reports confirm nine blacks were killed; some estimate hundreds died. Scores of others were driven from their homes…

3. In 1932,  Spingarn Medal awarded to Robert R. Moton, president of Tuskegee Institute, for his “thoughtful leadership in conservative opinion and action.”

4. In 1938,  Crystal Bird Fauset becomes the 1st black woman elected to a state legislature in the U.S. acquiring this distinction by being named to the Pennsylvania House of Represenatives.

5. In 1960,   Otis M. Smith elected auditor general of Michigan and became the first Black chosen in a statewide election since the Reconstruction period.

6. In 1966,  Edward W. Brooke elected first Black US Senator in 85 years. (Since Reconstruction)

7. In 1966,  John H. Johnson, publisher of Ebony and Jet magazines, awarded Spingarn Medal “for his productive imagination…in the perilous field of publishing” and “for his contributions to the enhancement of the Negro’s self-image through his publications.”

8. In 1966,  John Perry Jr. & H. F. Hunger Received Patent for Biochem fuel cell

Events In African American History For November 01


1. In 1604, William Shakespeare’s great play “Othello” was first performed at Whitehall Palace in London. It is the earliest known European play with a black lead character.

2. In 1866, America’s first Civil Rights Act is passed over the veto of President Andrew Johnson.

3. . In 1898, C. W. Allen received Patent for Self- Leveling Table

4. In 1910, Scholar and political activist WEB DuBois began publication of NAACP monthly magazine the Crisis.

5. In 1945, First issue of Ebony magazine published by John H. Johnson.

6. In 1951, Jet Magazine founded by Ebony Magazine Publisher J. H. Johnson.

7. In 1989, David Dinkins elected mayor of New York City.

8. in 1991, Clarence Thomas takes his seat on the United States Supreme Court.

Events In African American History For October 25


1. In 1892, 118 Years ago Today, L. F. Brown received Patent for Bridle bit Patent No. 484,994.

2. In 1940, 70 Years ago Today, Benjamin O. Davis Sr became the first Black general in US Army.

3. In 1940, Black newspaper owner’s group, the NNPA (Negro Newspaper Publishers Association), is founded.The group later changed its name to the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

4. In 1958, An estimated 10,000 students led by Jackie Robinson, Harry Belafonte, and labor leader A. Phillip Randolph, participate in a youth march for integrated schools in Washington, D.C.

5. In 1976, A  full pardon is granted to Clarence “Willie” Norris, the last known survivor of the nine “Scottsboro Boys.” The group of black men had been framed in a 1931 conviction for allegedly raping two white women.

6. In 1990, Evander Holyfield knocks out James “Buster” Douglas in the third round to become the undisputed world heavyweight champion.

7. In 1992, 18 Years ago Today, Cito Gaston, as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays, became the first Black Manager to lead a Major League Baseball team to win a world series title, defeating the Atlanta Braves.

8. in 1994  Susan Smith (a white woman) set off a nationwide man hunt when she claimed that a Black Man had car jacked her and kidnapped her two young children.  It was later revealed that she had murdered her two boys by buckling them in her car and driving them into a lake.

9. In 1997, 13 Years ago Today, The Million Woman March in Philadelphia at the Museum Of Art included Winnie Mandela and Maxine Waters as Keynote Speakers.

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For October 17


Jupiter Hammon
1. Jupiter Hammon, the first black American poet, is born in slavery. He was a Calvinist and a self-educated writer.  He was the first African American to publish his writings.  One of his poems appeared in print in 1760 and is considered one of the founders of African-American literature.

Cozy Cole

2. Cozy Cole (William R. Cole), jazz drummer who scored a #1 Cashbox magazine hit with the record “Topsy Part 2”. “Topsy” peaked at number three on Billboard Hot 100, and at number one on the R&B chart.  It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc.  The track peaked at #29 in the UK Singles Chart in 1958. The recording contained a lengthy drum solo, and was one of the few drum solo recordings that ever made the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The single was issued on the tiny Brooklyn-based Love Records label.

Lerone Bennett, Jr

3. Lerone Bennett, Jr. Historian, scholar, author and Ebony magazine editor. His best- known book is Before the Mayflower.  Bennett graduated from Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. He has noted this time was integral to his intellectual development. Mr. Bennett is also a distinguished member of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity.

Howard E. Rollins

4. Howard Ellsworth Rollins, television, film, and stage actor. He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Coalhouse Walker, Jr. in the film Ragtime, and as Virgil Tibbs on the NBC/CBS television series In the Heat of the Night.  He also starred as Captain Davenport in the 1984 drama A Soldier’s Story which also starred
Adolph Caesar, David Alan Grier, Denzel Washington and Robert Townsend.

Mae Jamison

5. Mae Jamison, physician and NASA astronaut. She became the first black woman to travel in space when she went into orbit aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour on September 12, 1992.

Ziggy Marley

6. David “Ziggy” Marley, musician and leader of the band Ziggy Marley and the Melody Makers. He is the oldest son of famed reggae musician Bob Marley.

wyclef jean

7. Wyclef Jean, musician, record producer, and politician.  He first received fame as a member of the acclaimed New Jersey hip hop group the Fugees. Along with being a world famous and highly respected performing artist, he is now a visiting fellow at Brown University in the Department of African Studies.

Events In African American History For October 04


1. In 1864, New Orleans Tribune founded by Dr. Louis C. Roudanez. The newspaper, published in both English and French, started as a tri-weekly but soon became an influential daily.

2. In 1887, R. Hawkins received Patent for Harness Attachment

3. In 1887, S. E. Thomas Received Patent for Waste trap for basin,closets, etc.

4. In 1892, G. E. Becket received Patent for Letter box

5. In 1949, J.B. Blayton purchased radio station WERD in Atlanta, GA.

6. In 1969,  Charles Evers elected Mayor Of Fayette, Miss.

7. In 1969,  Howard N. Lee elected Mayor of Chapel Hill, N.C.

8. In 1988, Bill and Camille Cosby make a $20 million gift to Spelman College.

9. In 1988, The Martin L. King, Jr. Federal Building is dedicated in Atlanta, Ga.

10. in 1991, The Harold Washington Library, the world’s largest public circulating library, named for the late Harold Washington, Chicago’s first Black Mayor, was dedicated.

At the time of its completion, the library was known as the nation’s largest municipal library with 750,000 square feet, a collection of 2 million books in 90 languages, a 400 seat auditorium and stood 10 stories tall with a glass-encased winter garden on the 9th floor.  The structure cost $144 million to build.

11. In 1996, Congress passes a bill authorizing the creation of 500,000 Black Revolutionary War Patriots Commemorative coins.

Events In African American History For Sept 28


1. In 1829, Walker’s Appeal, antislavery pamphlet, published in Boston by David Walker.The Appeal denounced slavery and called for slave revolt.

2. In 1868, Opelousas Massacre, St. Landry Parish, Louisiana. Terrorists killed 200  Blacks although other reports put the number well over 300.

3. In 1897, J. H. Haines received Patent for Portable Basin

4. In 1961, Purlie Victorious, a play by playwright Ossie Davis, opened on Broadway.

5. In 1967, Walter E. Washington, Lawyer, became the first Black mayor of a major American city, Washington, DC.

Events In African American History For Sept 19


 

1. In 1865, Atlanta University was founded

2. In 1881, Booker T. Washington opens Tuskegee Institute in Alabama

3. In 1893, E. R. Robinson Received Patent for Electric Railway Trolley

4. In 1943, Actor and activist, Paul Robeson, portrays Othello for the 296th time at New York City’s Shubert Theater.

5. In 1947, Jackie Robinson is named 1947 (Rookie of the Year)

6. In 1956, 1st Intl conference of Black Writers & Artists meets (Paris)

7. In 1967, Nigeria begins offensive against Biafra

8. In 1986, (Captain EO) with Michael Jackson premieres

9. In 1989, First issue of Emerge magazine goes on sale.

10. In 1989, Gordon Parks’ film The Learning Tree is registered in the National Film Registry of the Library of Congress.

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For Sept 05


John Wesley Cromwell

1. John Wesley Cromwell, journalist and educator, was born into slavery in Portsmouth, Virginia on September 5, 1846. After receiving freedom, Cromwell and his family moved to Philadelphia. In 1865, Cromwell returned to Portsmouth at the age of eighteen and opened a private school for freedmen in Portsmouth, , which failed due to racial harassment and replaced by programs held by the American Missionary Association.. Cromwell entered Howard University in Washington, D. C. in 1871. He received a law degree and was admitted to the bar in 1874. Cromwell was the first African American to practice law for the Interstate Commerce Commission.

Cromwell founded the weekly paper The People’s Advocate in 1876. In 1881, Cromwell was elected President of Bethel Library and Historical Association in Washington, D. C. Cromwell used this position to generate interest in African American history. He inspired the foundation of the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History in 1915.

Sunnyland Slim

2. Sunnyland Slim (Albert Luandrew), blues pianist, who was born in the Mississippi Delta and later moved to Chicago, to contribute to that city’s post-war scene as a center for blues music. He performed with many of the popular blues musicians of the day. His stage name came from a song he composed about the Sunnyland train that ran between Memphis and St. Louis, Missouri.   In 1942 he followed the great migration of southern workers to the industrial north in Chicago.  Through the years Sunnyland Slim played with such musicians as Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf Robert Lockwood, Jr., and Little Walter.

Buddy Miles

3. George Allen Miles, Jr., known as Buddy Miles, was an American rock and funk drummer, most known as a founding member of The Electric Flag in 1967, then as a member of Jimi Hendrix’s Band of Gypsys from 1969 through to January 1970.

Terry Ellis

4. Terry Lynn Ellis, R&B singer best known for her work with the all female quartet En Vogue.

Events In African American History For August 19


1. In 1791, Benjamin Banneker sent a copy of his first almanac to secretary of state Thomas Jefferson. In an enclosed letter, he questioned the slaveholder’s sincerity as a “friend to liberty.” He urged Jefferson to help get rid of “absurd and false ideas” that one race is superior to another. He wished Jefferson’s sentiments to be the same as his, that “one Universal Father . . . afforded us all the same sensations and endowed us all with the same faculties.” Jefferson responded with praise for Banneker’s accomplishments.

2. In 1889, G. A. E. Barnes received Patent for Design for Sign

3. In 1926, Theodore Flowers wins the the world middleweight title in New York City

4. In 1950, Edith Sampson is the first African American appointed as a representative to the UN.

5. In 1954, Diplomat and first Black winner of Nobel Peace Prize, Ralph J Bunche, named undersecretary of the United Nations, 1954

6. In 1963, N.A.A.C.P. Youth Council begins sit-ins at lunch counters, Oklahoma City.

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