Nothing will motivate a man to move forward faster than knowing what's behind Him.

Archive for November, 2018

Catherine Lavonne Moore’s Eulogy


Eulogy 2pg.pdf

HOW TO CURE A CAST IRON SKILLET​


HOW TO CURE A CAST IRON SKILLET​

Cast-iron skillets are incredibly versatile and a must-have in the kitchen. According to Cook’s Illustrated, cast-iron skillets can be used for frying, searing or baking, and they retain heat better than other types of cookware. Curing, or seasoning, your skillet is the key to preventing rust and creating a natural nonstick finish. With proper use and regular seasoning, a cast-iron skillet can last for decades. Many cast-iron skillets are now sold pre-seasoned, but you should still know how to cure your skillet to keep it looking and cooking like new.​

Step 1 ​
Preheat your oven to 350 degrees F.​

Step 2 ​
Wash your cast-iron skillet with warm water and liquid dishwashing soap. You should normally never use dishwashing soap on your skillet; the only time it is appropriate is right before you cure it.​

Step 3 ​
Dry the skillet well with a clean dish towel.​

Step 4 ​
Put 1 to 2 tbsp. of vegetable oil or shortening into the skillet and rub it evenly around the surface, using a dry paper towel. Only a thin layer of oil is needed.​

Step 5 ​
Place the skillet upside-down in the oven and place a layer of aluminium foil underneath to catch any oil. Set your timer for 1 hour.​

Step 6 ​
Turn off the oven and let your skillet cool in the oven for about 30 minutes. Remove the skillet and lightly wipe the surface with a clean paper towel to remove any excess oil.​

Step 7 ​
Use your skillet for all types of cooking now that is properly cured. After each use, rinse the skillet with warm water and remove any food particles with a sponge or scrub brush. Do not use soap. Dry the skillet and then coat it lightly with cooking spray.​

Step 8 ​
Repeat the curing process anytime your skillet starts looking dull or dry.​
Some recipes require that you start preparing them on the stove, then finish the cooking in the oven. An ovenproof skillet makes this cooking technique simple since you don’t have to transfer the food from one dish to another. Choose an ovenproof skillet that is best suited to the types of dishes you like to prepare.​

Ovenproof skillets can be made of a wide variety of materials, such as cast iron, copper, aluminum or a combination of different materials. Ovenproof skillets are typically labeled as such when you purchase them and will likely say something like "ovenproof to 425 degrees" or "safe for broiling."​

Beginning to look a lot like christmas


Image

Thanksgiving dinner


Had Some Visitors Up For The Funeral


IMG_3155IMG_3156IMG_3162IMG_3166IMG_3171IMG_3172IMG_3175IMG_3179IMG_3183IMG_3185IMG_3187IMG_3188IMG_3192IMG_3195IMG_3199IMG_3205IMG_3207IMG_3212IMG_3220IMG_3224

Ready to send her home.


20181106_114044

My Wife Passed Away, CAN SOMEONE PLEASE HELP?


IMG_20181029_0001

Friday Oct. 26, 2018 My wife fell ill shortly after arriving at work at Lake Louise Elementary School to perform her duties as a Para-Educator.   An ambulance was called and one of the Teachers call me and I gave the Medic her information.  She was taken to St. Joes hospital in Tacoma where she later died.  Even though I gave the medic her information, she was listed in the ER as Jane Doe.   I went to the hospital and was told that I need to tell them who was to pick her up and I told them.   I talked to Mountain View Funeral home In Lakewood,  WA and told them that my wife had passed and was at St. Joes In Tacoma,  WA .  Later that evening (3pm)  I was contacted by Sight Life (206-682-8501)inquiring about her eyes for donation.  (The death certificate hadn’t been signed).   On Sunday October 28th We went to Mountain View Funeral home to make final arrangements.  We found out later that Nothing can really be done until someone signs off on the Death Certificate.  We were informed by St. Joes that ER doctors do not sign death certificates.  Meanwhile they are shoving contracts at us to sign.   Apparently there is a 72hr grace period before the death certificate has to be signed.  The grace period has come and gone.  We have been getting the runaround for four days and it looks like there is no resolution to this problem.  meanwhile She is laying at the funeral home awaiting her internment.  A grieving family should not have to go through this.   We are now wondering if there is more to this story.    CAN SOMEONE PLEASE HELP?

Thanks,

Johnny B. Moore

 

Tag Cloud