Nothing will motivate a man to move forward faster than knowing what's behind Him.


1. Rufus Thomas, Jr., was an American rhythm and blues, funk and soul singer and comedian fromMemphis, Tennessee, who recorded on Sun Records in the 1950s and on Stax Records in the 1960s and 1970s. He was the father of soul singer Carla Thomas and keyboard player Marvell Thomas. A third child, Vaneese, a former French teacher, has a recording studio in upstate New York and sings for television commercials.

Leroy Carr

2. Leroy Carr,  blues singer, songwriter and pianist who developed a laid-back, crooning technique and whose popularity and style influenced such artists as Nat King Cole and Ray Charles. He first became famous for “How Long, How Long Blues” on Vocalion Records in 1928.

Robert (Junior) Lockwood

3. Robert (Junior) Lockwood, Blues Guitarist who recorded for Chess Records among other Chicago labels in the 1950s and 1960s. He is best known as a longtime collaborator with Sonny Boy Williamson II, and for his work in the mid 1950s with Little Walter Jacobs.

Sarah Vaughan

4. Sarah Lois Vaughn, was an American jazz singer,  She had a contralto vocal range. Nicknamed “Sailor” (for her salty speech), “Sassy” and “The Divine One“, Sarah Vaughan was a Grammy Award winner. The National Endowment for the Arts bestowed upon her its “highest honor in jazz”, the NEA Jazz Masters Award, in 1989.

Junior Parker

5. Herman (Little Junior) Parker, Blues Artist/Vocalist/Harmonica, successful and influential Memphis blues singer and musician. He is best remembered for his unique voice which has been described as “honeyed,” and “velvet-smooth”. He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2001.

Arthur Mitchell

6. Arthur Mitchell, dancer and choreographer who created a training school and the first African-American classical ballet company, Dance Theatre of Harlem. Among other awards, he has been recognized as a MacArthur Fellow, inducted into the National Museum of Dance’s Hall of Fame, and has received the United States National Medal of Arts and a Fletcher Foundation fellowship.

Johnny Clyde Copeland

7. Johnny Clyde Copeland, Blues Artist/Guitarist and Vocalist.   He won a Grammy in 1987 for best traditional blues album for the album Showdown!, recorded with Robert Cray and Albert Collins. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1J_Dc_lj4d8

Randall Cunningham

8. Randall Cunningham, is a former American football quarterback.  After playing college football at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, he was selected in the second round of the 1985 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles, with whom he remained through the 1995 season. He announced his retirement from football following the end of that season, taking a job as an analyst for TNT in 1996. The following year, however, he resumed his playing career. He played for the Minnesota Vikings (1997–1999), the Dallas Cowboys (2000), and the Baltimore Ravens (2001). Cunningham then re-signed with the Philadelphia Eagles and retired for good in 2002.He won the Bert Bell Award in 1990, the height of the ‘Ultimate Weapon’ stories. He is the younger brother of former college and professional football player Sam Cunningham who played for the New England Patriots.

Mariah Carey

9. Mariah Carey, She made her recording debut in 1990 under the guidance of Columbia Records executive Tommy Mottola, and became the first recording artist to have her first five singles top the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart. A series of hit records established her position as Columbia’s highest-selling act. According to Billboard magazine, she was the most successful artist of the 1990s in the United States.

10 Walter “Bunny” Sigler, A pop and R&B songwriter and record producer who has done extensive work with the team of Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff,[1] and who was instrumental in creating the “Philly Sound” in the early 1970s. He is nicknamed “Mr. Emotion.”

Sigler has worked with most of the artists associated with the Philadelphia stable including The O’Jays, The Roots, Jackie Moore, Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, Barbara Mason, Billy Paul, Lou Rawls, Patti LaBelle and Stephanie Mills. He also co-wrote “The Ruler’s Back”, the opening song on the widely respected and critically acclaimed album The Blueprint by Jay-Z.

Originally a performer, Sigler first recorded for the V-Tone Records label in 1959. He has also recorded for the Decca, Parkway, Gamble, Philadelphia International and Gold Mind labels. Gold Mind, headed by Philly guitarist/writer/producer/arranger Norman Harris was a subsidiary of Salsoul Records. In 1967, he had a hit record on Parkway: a cover of “Let the Good Times Roll/Feel So Good,” which peaked at #22 in August.

Walter Sigler sang the “23rd Psalm” at the ceremony awarding the Congressional Gold Medal to the Tuskegee Airmen on March 29, 2007, at the United States Capitol.

On October 18, 2008, Sigler sang the United States National Anthem before the Kelly Pavlik vs. Bernard Hopkins boxing match.

In 2009, Sigler wrote a single and performed a number of concerts with Israeli hip hip jazz fusion group Coolooloosh.

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